Pomeranian Checks

Pomeranian dog lovers will love our selection of cute Pomeranian checks. We collect top online check merchants Pomeranian check designs, so you don't have too. Browse our adorable check selection and enjoy your favorite Pomeranian checks today.

 
Playful Pomeranians Personal Checks

Playful Pomeranians Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Pomeranian Personal Checks

Pomeranian Personal Checks

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Carousel Checks

As low as: $19.99

Pomeranian Spitz Personal Checks

Pomeranian Spitz Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Smart Pomeranian Pooch Personal Checks

Smart Pomeranian Pooch Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Best Breeds - Pomeranian Personal Checks

Best Breeds – Pomeranian Personal Checks

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Bradford Exchange Checks

As low as: $39.90

Pomeranian Personal Checks

Pomeranian Personal Checks

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Bradford Exchange Checks

As low as: $39.90

 

The Tale of the Shrinking Pomeranian

pomeranian
Pomeranian

Many might say that the Pomeranian is a big dog in a little dog’s body. Considering the speed in which the Pomeranian decreased in size through selective breeding, this seems particularly true. As is often the case, celebrity preferences can influence trends, and in the case of the Pomeranian, a queen’s preference for small dogs led to the Pomeranian that we know today.

A Smaller Spitz

The Pomeranian is descended from the German Spitz, and the German Spitz derives from the general Spitz category of dogs. Spitz dogs include large breeds, such as the Alaskan Malamute, as well as other small breeds such as the Keeshond and, of course, the Pomeranian. The common characteristics of any Spitz are a thick, long coat and a pointed muzzle and ears.

Although the exact origins of the Pomeranian are unclear, the breed’s early foundations most likely were developed in Germany and Poland, specifically in the area known as Pomerania. By the 1800s, the breed was known in Britain, but the Pomeranians of the time were much larger, often weighing up to 30 pounds. They had already become pets of the monarchy, and by the late 1800s, they had become favorites of Queen Victoria, who had begun breeding them. Her fascination with the breed and involvement in its development played a large role in the reduction of the breed’s size. Although Pomeranian breeders had already begun reducing the size, Queen Victoria’s preference and promotion of the breed saw them shrink in size 50% during her lifetime.

Colorful Coat

Although the Pomeranian’s size reduced fairly rapidly, it is still a compact and healthy breed. It stands 8-11 inches tall and weighs a mere 3-7 pounds, yet the overall body shape is square and sturdy.

The characteristic that most people first notice is the Pomeranian’s fluffy coat. Its double coat is made up of a thick, short undercoat with longer guard hairs, topped by an outer coat that is longer, standing off from the body, giving the breed its signature pouf appearance. However, despite its appearance, the fur is often somewhat harsh in texture, since a soft coat would not create the same fullness of appearance. Ideally, grooming should be done daily, especially during shedding season, but it should at least be done two or three times a week.

The breed’s coloring has changed over the years. Early Pomeranians were often white or gray, but by the late 1800s, as the shift in size occurred, so did an expansion of color. Nowadays, the Pomeranian comes in a variety of colors and patterns, including brindle, parti- and piebald. Typical coloring can include cream, white, black, brown, red, orange, or combinations, such as black and tan. The eyes and nose are typically dark.

Lively Companions

The Pomeranian is no shrinking violet. This extroverted breed is full of life and joy. They are intelligent dogs who respond well to thoughtful training. As a result, despite their small size, they can do very well in obedience training and other activities. They can even partake in agility training, although their small size needs to be considered when it comes to jumps.

The Pomeranian and its ancestors were often watchdogs, alerting their owners to intruders through barking. Unfortunately, Pomeranians are likely to bark, sometimes excessively, if not properly trained.

They are affectionate, social dogs who like to spend as much time as possible with their family. Thus, it is important that they not be left alone for long periods of time. This can cause separation anxiety in some dogs, which can result in bad behaviors, including excessive barking. This is particularly troublesome if you live in an apartment, where the constant barking can drive your neighbors crazy.

Fortunately, if given the appropriate attention and exercise, as well as toys and games that can mentally challenge your smart Pomeranian, you will find yourself with a wonderful companion. Lively and friendly, they will soon have you wrapped around their little paw.

  • Sled dogs from Iceland and Lapland make up some of the Pomeranian’s ancestors. This is borne out by the fact that some Pomeranians can be trained to compete in miniature cart pulling.
  • Two Pomeranians were among the three dogs that survived the sinking of the Titanic.
  • Historic famous owners of Pomeranians include Charles Darwin, King George IV of England, and the wife of Napoleon I of France.
  • Contemporary celebrities who share their life with a Pomeranian include Keanu Reeves, Sharon Osbourne, and Bill Cosby.
  • Pomeranians are also known as Poms, Pompoms, or Puffballs.
 
 

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