Pekingese Checks

Pekingese dog lovers will love our selection of cute Pekingese checks. We search top online check merchants, who offer Pekingese check designs, so you don't have too. Browse our adorable check selection and enjoy your favorite lab checks today.

 
Perky Pekingese Personal Checks

Perky Pekingese Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Pekingese Princess Personal Checks

Pekingese Princess Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Pekingese Fun Personal Checks

Pekingese Fun Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Pekingese Personal Checks

Pekingese Personal Checks

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Bradford Exchange Checks

As low as: $39.90

 

Pekingese: The Lovable Little Lion

Pekingese
Photo Credit: Photo8.org

Tales of love surround the legend of the Pekingese. There are three primary stories that serve as the foundation for the breed and the unifying element is that of a lion in love. Whether it was a marmoset, a butterfly, or a monkey that was the object of the lion’s affection, love – and the help of the Buddha – conquered their difference in size and the result was the Pekingese.

Chinese Treasure

For those with a less romantic spirit, the true history of the Pekingese is still a long and fascinating story. Although it is possible that the breed may have 2000 years of history, the first known records date back to the 8th century Tang Dynasty. These dogs were the domain of the Chinese royalty, and it was centuries before this breed could be owned by anyone other than a member of the Imperial Palace. In fact, the pureness of this breed appears in its DNA. Besides being one of the oldest existing breeds, it is also one of the closest genetically to its early wolf ancestors.

In 1860, during the Second Opium War, Emperor Xianfeng fled the Old Summer Palace, which was taken over by British and French troops. There, they found five Pekingese who had remained behind with an elderly aunt of the emperor. Although the aunt had died, the Pekingese were rescued and taken back to Britain, where they were gifted to Queen Victoria, the Duchess of Wellington, and the Duke and Duchess of Richmond and Gordon. Not long afterward, the Empress Dowager Cixi herself gave some of the Pekingese dogs to notable Americans, including John Pierpont Morgan and Alice Longworth, daughter of Theodore Roosevelt. By the early 1900s, the Pekingese had become well-known and were growing in popularity in the Western world.

Prize Appearance

The fact that the Pekingese was limited to members of the Chinese Imperial family for so long may have played a part in keeping the breed almost unchanged for so long. Although the Chinese did not follow strict breeding programs in the early centuries, they did maintain illustrated books with examples of the most prized Pekingese. These images were kept as standards for what the breed should look like. Interestingly, the early breeders sought to encourage the best traits in their dogs by showing them pictures and statues of the most attractive dogs, and hanging preferred fur colors in their sleeping quarters.

The Pekingese is compact, but balanced, and surprisingly heavy for its size. Generally, it should weigh no more than 14 pounds, but it is still quite muscular. The body is longer than it is tall, but the large head should still be in proportion to the rest of the body.

The most striking features of the Pekingese are the flat face and the thick, long coat. The coat can come in any color and it is generally longest and fullest around the head and shoulders, creating the lion-mane effect. The outer top coat is coarse, while the undercoat is soft and thick. However, unless your dog is a show dog, most Pekingese owners prefer to keep their dog in a shorter puppy clip. Not only does this cut down on daily grooming, but it also helps to prevent the dog from becoming overheated during warm weather.

Because of the breed’s flat face, it can have difficulty breathing and regulating its temperature. In fact, because of health concerns many dog associations and Pekingese breed groups have altered the breed standard recently to put less emphasis on a flat face. Now, standards tend to emphasize that a muzzle should be evident, putting the breed’s health above stylistic extremes.

The Pekingese may be a small breed, but they are bold and courageous as befits their legendary lion ancestor. They are intelligent and can be opinionated, but they are also highly affectionate family members. Bred as companions for emperors for hundreds, if not thousands, of years, anyone who chooses to share their life with this fascinating breed is sure to have a loyal canine friend.

  • During the time that only the Imperial family could own a Pekingese, the theft of one of the dogs was punishable by death.
  • Among the various names the breed has been known by are Lion Dog, Sun Dog, Chinese Spaniel, and Sleeve Dog (in reference to the dogs being carried around in the full sleeves of the Imperial household).
  • The Pekingese has also served as a Buddhist temple dog, not just as a companion but as a hunter of small demons.
  • A Pekingese was one of only two dogs that survived the sinking of the Titanic.
  • Some celebrity Pekingese fanciers include Betty White, Elizabeth Taylor, and Shirley Temple.
 
 

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