Dalmatian Checks

Dalmatian lovers will love our selection of cute Dalmatian checks. We search online check merchants that offer Dalmatian check designs so you don't have too. Browse our adorable check selection and enjoy your favorite dog breed checks today.

 
Dalmatians Personal Checks

Dalmatians Personal Checks

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Carousel Checks

As low as: $19.99

Dalmatians Personal Checks

Dalmatians Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Dandy Dalmatians Personal Checks

Dandy Dalmatians Personal Checks

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Bank Checks Plus

As low as: $15.95

Dalmatians Top Stub Checks

Dalmatians Top Stub Checks

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Carousel Checks

As low as: $19.99

101 Dalmatians Personal Checks

101 Dalmatians Personal Checks

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Bradford Exchange Checks

As low as: $39.90

Dalmatians Side Tear Checks

Dalmatians Side Tear Checks

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Carousel Checks

As low as: $19.99

Best Breeds - Dalmatian Personal Checks

Best Breeds – Dalmatian Personal Checks

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Bradford Exchange Checks

As low as: $39.90

101 Dalmatians Checkbook Cover

101 Dalmatians Checkbook Cover

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Bradford Exchange Checks

As low as: $19.99

Dalmatians Leather Cover

Dalmatians Leather Cover

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Carousel Checks

As low as: $18.99

 

The Spotted Mystery of the Dalmatian

Dalmatians
Dalmatians

The iconic image of the firehouse Dalmatian is so popular that firehouses still have Dalmatian mascots, even though the dogs aren’t used as working dogs anymore. Yet this is just the latest in the many jobs that the Dalmatian has had over the years. Spotted dogs have existed for centuries across Europe, Asia, and Africa, but the origins of the Dalmatian remain shrouded in mystery.

Despite what many would expect, there’s little reason to think that the Dalmatian is native to Dalmatia. In reality, that seems to have been just one of the many locations these spotted dogs have appeared. They have been depicted on Egyptian tombs, Renaissance chapel paintings, and seen travelling through India and Europe with the Romany.

Dog of All Trades

The story of the Dalmatian’s origins may be as spotted as its coat, but its role as a working dog is in no doubt. Over the centuries, the Dalmatian and its ancestors have worked a variety of jobs. In Dalmatia, now known as Croatia, the dogs were used as guards. They have continued to work as guard dogs, although the items being guarded have changed quite often. However, guard duty isn’t the only job on their resume. They’ve also worked as ratters, shepherds, retrievers, and even as circus dogs.

Their role as guard dogs crossed with their job as coaching dogs, which has become one of their most famous and enduring jobs. As horse-drawn coaches and carriages became regular means of transport, particularly in England, Dalmatians were used to run ahead of the coach to clear the path or to run alongside the coach, offering some protection. Returning to guard duty, the Dalmatian would be responsible for guarding the horse and coach when it was stopped for the day.

These two responsibilities would again be part of the Dalmatian’s job description when it made its way to the United States. Instead of accompanying regular coaches, the Dalmatian became a firehouse dog, this time running with the horse-drawn fire trucks and guarding the equipment and horses during the fire fighting. Stories suggest that the Dalmatian also took it upon himself to save some people from the burning buildings. Back at the fire house, he would return to duty watching over the horses and equipment. Throughout history, the Dalmatian seems to have had a strong relationship with horses, which continues to this day.

Changing Spots

The Dalmatian is instantly recognized by its smooth white coat with clearly defined black or liver-brown spots. Dalmatians are white at birth but their spots start to appear within a week and continue to develop as they grow. Some Dalmatians end up with patches rather than traditional spots. Although there is nothing wrong with these dogs, they are not accepted in the show ring.

Dalmatians shed quite a bit throughout the year, but regular brushing can help keep this under control. To make up for the shedding, the Dalmatian has little of the typical doggy odor and stays quite clean, due to a minimum of oil in its coat.

Because of the Dalmatian’s history running along with coaches for miles at a time, it should come as no surprise that the Dalmatian is an energetic dog that needs a lot of exercise and interaction. Thus, while the Dalmatian does make an excellent family pet, it is important to ensure that he will receive both the exercise and attention he needs. Dalmatians like to be in the thick of things with their family and don’t do well when left alone for long. They are medium-sized dogs, standing approximately 23 inches at the shoulder and weighing between 40 and 60 pounds. Their size, combined with their energy levels, means that they may not be best around very young children.

The Disney Dilemma

Unfortunately, with the success of the 101 Dalmatians movies, many people went out and bought Dalmatians for themselves and their children, without doing the proper research. Dalmatians require proper socialization and training, as well as plenty of exercise, and many people were not prepared for the responsibility. Additionally, unscrupulous breeders sometimes sold dogs that were deaf, which is a somewhat common health problem with the breed. Deaf dogs can be harder to train, obviously, and are more likely to nip or bite when startled.

Fortunately, although many Dalmatians were given up, many breed rescue groups stepped up to care for these dogs and helped them find new homes that were suitable. The Dalmatian is a loving and loyal pet for the right person. Eager to please and full of inquisitiveness and joy, the Dalmatian, no matter what his origins, is an amazing dog.

  • Befitting the breed’s firehouse past, the American National Fire Protection Association has a Dalmatian named Sparky the Fire Dog as their mascot.
  • Beer company Anheuser-Busch and its famous team of Clydesdale horses are always accompanied by a Dalmatian.
  • Other names associated with the Dalmatian are: the carriage dog, the plum pudding dog, and the English coach dog.
  • The Dalmatian’s urinary system is unusual in that the breed is unable to metabolize uric acid, leading to the development of stones.
  • Dalmatians do well with agility, obedience, flyball, and other dog sports. They also make excellent companions for people who enjoy biking, hiking, and jogging.
 
 

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